The Best Towing Tires with E Load Rating – All You Need to Know

The Best Towing Tires with E Load Rating – All You Need to Know

Towing a boat, cargo trailer, or vehicle trailer can be frustrating and time-consuming. Add in dealing with replacing and maintaining tires, and you might need to set aside a few more hours than expected. Finding towing tires you can rely on to power through a range of scenarios without wasting time or resources might not seem easy, but we have a solution.

Here we’ll go over the different types of towing tires with E load ratings, how to find the best ones, and share our top picks for every towing need.

Bottom Line Up Front

Tires are not just tires when it comes to getting your equipment where it needs to go, so our top pick for the best towing tires with E load rating is Forceum M/T 08 Plus Mud Tires. Heavy-duty construction means nothing can stand in your way, and built-in channels help slough off dirt, mud, and redirect water to avoid hydroplaning when roads are slick.

Stability and weather resistance are highlights with Forceum’s mud tires, but we agree they may be overkill in some towing scenarios. Read on for more on the different types of towing tires and how to find the best ones with E load ratings.

Different Types of Towing Tires with E Load Rating

towing tire

All tires with E load ratings have one thing in common: they can handle the same amount of pressure overall. Similarities end there, though. Everything from all-terrain to snow tires is available in E load rating styles for a range of towable vehicles and equipment.

Types of Tire Sizes

Some load E tires carry the label “trailer only,” which means you shouldn’t purchase them thinking they’ll fit on your truck or another type of vehicle. An easy way to tell what type of tire you’re looking at is to check the tire type—the letter at the beginning of the tire size.

Letter “P” at the beginning of the size means P-Metric Passenger vehicles, LT indicates light truck use, and a lack of letters altogether means you’re looking at a Euro-metric tire. P and Euro-metric tires can have different load ratings, so pay attention to these numbers when shopping (especially online).

You may also see different vehicle service types such as M for motorcycle, C for acommercial truck, T for temporary, and ST for special trailer.

Styles of Towing Tires

Like standard vehicle tires, towing tires come in a range of styles with varying features. Most commonly you can find four main types of tires;

  • All-terrain
  • Off-road
  • Mud
  • Snow

All-terrain is the most common tire type because, as the name suggests, the tires can often provide a smooth towing experience on pavement, asphalt, dirt, and other surfaces as necessary. Off-road tires tend to have more built-in protection against jagged rocks and other four-wheeling dangers—helpful for heavy-duty trailers carrying dirt bikes or other motorsports vehicles.

Mud tires are generally tacky and soft and slough off mud and dirt before it becomes caked on. For transporting work or recreational equipment, mudding tires can help avoid sticky situations involving washed out roads and other obstacles.

Snow tires offer extra traction in snowy and icy conditions, helping ensure you stay on the road while navigating with your tow vehicle. No guarantees exist, but snow tires are typically a go-to in colder climates since they can withstand temperature fluctuations without damage.

How to Find the Best Towing Tires with E Load Rating

tire

Finding the best towing tires with an E load rating involves understanding the ratings themselves and knowing what to look for when it comes to features. Here’s what you need to know to find the best towing tires with an E rating.

Know What Load Ratings Mean

When we say E load ratings, what do we mean, and why does it matter? Every tire carries a load range rating to indicate how much weight it can carry.

Keep in mind the load rating is a figure the manufacturer settled on after doing laboratory testing. Actual ratings can vary due to weather conditions, tire condition, pressure level, and even the road you’re driving on, so it’s essential to know no rating is an exact science.

An E load rating means a tire can handle a maximum load pressure of 80 psi under ideal (laboratory-controlled) conditions. Other factors influence how “true” this number is, though. Operating temperatures can affect pressure, as more heat means higher pressure. Higher heat also means a lower load-carrying capacity, and weight can also increase heat because of friction.

Back when tires were made up of layers of cotton instead of more modern materials, load ratings equated to “ply” ratings. Traditional load ratings would mean E is equivalent to a 10-ply rating. Manufacturers often mention ply ratings along with load ratings, so it’s a fact to keep in mind while shopping.

Understand Your Vehicle’s Limits

Just because you have four tires with E load ratings doesn’t necessarily mean you can load your vehicle and its trailer full up.

Notice the condition of your tires, the inflation level, outside temperatures, and other factors which influence the overall function of your vehicle and trailer. Know the conditions and keep in mind the load rating is a guideline, not a hard and fast guarantee.

Follow safe towing practices every time you hitch up and make regular pre-trip checks part of your itinerary no matter how short you expect the drive to be. Low tire pressure or a nail in one of your tires could severely impact the actual load rating of your tires, so it’s worth a few extra minutes to ensure you’re towing safely.

Check Other Tire Specifications

A high load rating is great, but when you ignore the remaining specifications on your tires, you’re inviting disaster. Tire size includes measurements for the width, aspect ratio, diameter, speed rating, and more, so looking at only one number doesn’t show us the bigger picture.

How warm your tires are running can also affect their actual load-carrying capacity, and temperatures can vary based on how and how much you’re towing.

Look for the Right Numbers

We reference the letter E here, but keep in mind some manufacturers still use the “old-fashioned” label of 10 ply for E load tires. If a tire carries a label for “10 ply,” it still means an equivalent load of 80 psi and the same E rating.

Towing Tire Features

You might think tires are just tires, but there are a handful of helpful features we’ve found in nearly every type of tire on the market. Towing tires tend to focus on ruggedness because, after all, they trail behind your primary vehicle and regularly deal with a lot of bumps and jostling.

Manufacturers realize the importance of safe and high-performance towing tires, so features like rim protectors to avoid curb scrapes are standard on higher-range tires. Chip resistant materials are another handy feature because tougher tires mean lower odds of one blowing while you travel across rough terrain.

Self-cleaning tread helps avoid hydroplaning incidents and mud buildup, depending on where you’re driving, and carefully designed tread channels help divert water. Softer tires offer more grip, enhancing traction, but there is something to be said for more rigid tire walls for stability, too.

Consider What You’re Towing

Many tires carry an E load rating, but not all of them work on any type of trailer. Look at the manufacturer specifications to ensure you’re buying tires compatible to the make and model of trailer you tow. Check measurements, too, just to be on the safe side, especially when buying online!

Think about where you’re going as well; you don’t need mudding tires for a trailer that won’t ever see a puddle. If you routinely tow your ATVs or dirt bikes off road, however, you’ll want heavier-duty tires with better traction for those scenarios.

Weight can also be a factor when shopping for tires, especially if the trailer you’re going to tow is on the heavier side. Choosing tires which not only fit your trailer but also balance it helps ensure everything works properly and stays that way over time.

Best Towing Tire Brands to Consider

Cooper Tires Discoverer A/T3 All-Terrain Tire

cooper tire

Unique silica-based tread compound and other off-road-friendly features make the Discoverer A/T3 an excellent multi-function towing tire.

  • LT235/85R16 120/116R E (10 ply)
  • Five-rib all-terrain design
  • Silica-based tread compound
  • Cut and chip resistant
  • Broken center rib for soft surface traction
  • Dual draft tread element walls
  • Speed rating R
  • Tread wear indicator
  • Low rolling resistance
  • 16.5 tread depth

When we call Cooper Tires’ Discoverer A/T3 tacky, we mean it in a good way. A silica-based tread compound helps make the tire’s surface squishy, helping the tire resist chips and cuts if you run into sharp rocks or other obstacles. Silica compound also helps enhance traction in wet weather, meaning you can tow in a few different seasons with these tires.

Tread wear indicators let you know when time is about up on each tire, but the aggressive five-rib design helps offer performance and longevity. In exchange for a bit of noise, you get a grippy tire which performs come snow or sleet—earning the Discoverer tire a spot on our best-of list for towing.

Pros

  • Truly all-terrain thanks to treading compound
  • Chip resistant for off-road applications

Cons

  • A little loud

Grand Ride Trailer Tires

premium grand ride trailer tires

Premium tires for your trailer at a budget-conscious cost, Grand Ride’s trailer tires have safety and convenience in mind.

  • ST235/85R16
  • Nylon cap ply
  • Trailer use only
  • Speed rating V

Nylon overlay across the entire tread area is a top feature with Grand Ride, and the manufacturer highlights the safety upgrade over tires with nylon strips only on the shoulder area. Visually, you won’t notice a ton of stylistic appeal, but when you have functionality, looks aren’t crucial.

Grand Ride’s tires stick to the road, don’t lose grip in wet conditions, and travel relatively quietly, for those who are particular about dealing with excess noise. Grand Ride offers a range of tires for different applications, so be sure you’re selecting the right tire based on the description, not the image the manufacturer shows.

Pros

  • Quiet tread
  • Good grip

Cons

  • Images may not match the item description (tough to get an idea of what they look like before ordering)

Forceum M/T 08 Plus Mud Tires

forceum tires

If slogging through mud is your forte, Forceum’s heavy-duty all-season tires might be the perfect fit for your towing scenario.

  • LT265/70R17 121/118P
  • All season
  • Mud terrain
  • Light truck
  • Speed rating P
  • Center rib for responsiveness

All-weather construction means Forceum’s mud tires are heavy duty and ready for any condition. Self-cleaning tread keeps snow and mud from building up between the tread blocks and channels water away, preventing hydroplaning incidents.

A center rib helps make the tires more responsive and stable, plus enhance traction in the mud. Stability is an overall highlight, and you can tell from the bulk of the tire that these aren’t casual summer tires—they mean business. If you often need to transport equipment, vehicles, or anything else during bad weather or through unpaved portions of the road, we think you can’t go wrong with Forceum.

Pros

  • All-weather
  • Snow and mud capable

Cons

  • Tread wears quickly

Radar Angler RST22

radar angler

Radar Angler’s RST22 tires come in a convenient set of four for bottom-line-focused consumers who need a full set of tires with longevity and energy conserving features.

  • ST225/75R15 117/112L
  • Compatible with popular boat and utility/cargo trailer brands
  • Speed rating L
  • .24-inch tread depth
  • Ribbed tread design
  • Low rolling resistance

Evenly distributed pressure and ribbed design helps the Radar Angler RST22 tire to last longer and keep its shape even under heavy loads. Unique compound construction helps with traction, and built-in grooves avoid hydroplaning by pushing water and slush out from under the tires.

Low rolling resistance might even mean better fuel economy, depending on what you’re towing and where making Radar Angler’s tires a potentially budget-conscious option. Longer tread life also helps preserve your investment over time.

Pros

  • Longer tread life with ribbed design
  • Hydroplaning prevention

Cons

  • Only available in a set of four

MaxAuto Trailer Tires

max auto

MaxAuto’s trailer tires are a sensible solution for most towing needs, and with an E load rating, you know they’ll handle heavier loads.

  • ST235/80R16 125/121L
  • Compatible with popular boat and trailer brands
  • Speed rating L
  • 7.6 mm tread depth

For pavement and asphalt driving, MaxAuto’s trailer tires are a smart option. With smooth operation and quiet towing, you might forget you have a boat or cargo trailer behind you. If you need towing tires for a backup trailer or just replacements for decaying tires you’ve had for years, MaxAuto’s are a safe bet.

Traversing muddy and snowy conditions might be tough, but if you’re mostly driving on the open road (or to the local lake), these tires will take care of your needs without breaking the bank.

Pros

  • Trim and functional for boat trailers
  • Quiet and smooth operation

Cons

  • No guarantees on similar manufacture dates

Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac

goodyear dura trac tire

Bulky and rugged, Goodyear’s Wrangler DuraTrac tires give you all-seasons navigability and even self-cleaning features.

  • 33×12.50R20 114Q
  • Speed rating Q
  • 18 tread depth
  • Self-cleaning shoulder
  • Angled center tread blocks
  • Rim protector
  • All-seasons

If you need equipment to weather heavy snow, mud, and anything else Mother Nature throws at you, Goodyear’s Wrangler DuraTrac tires might be the best option. Rugged and heavy-duty, the DuraTrac tires have self-cleaning shoulder blocks to keep the tread free of debris. Gravel, mud, and dirt don’t stand a chance, and a rim protector keeps your wheels from sustaining damage from curb bumps.

Road noise is practically nonexistent thanks to the highly angled center tread blocks, which help with both traction and lateral stability. Our only qualm is the DuraTracs are not exactly a budget pick—if you can make room in the budget, however, these are sure to deliver high performance no matter the weather or road conditions.

Pros

  • Quiet ride
  • Aggressive tread

Cons

  • Not a budget option
  • Comparing the Options
Product Size Best for… Features 
Cooper Discoverer A/T3 LT235/85R16 All-terrain Cut and chip resistant, on- and off-road
Grand Ride Trailer Tires  ST235/85R16Paved roads Nylon cap ply 
MaxAuto Trailer Tires ST235/80R16Paved roads/boat trailers Wide boat/utility and cargo trailer compatibility 
Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac 33x12.50R20 Snow/mud Self-cleaning shoulder, rim protector 
Radar Angler RST22 ST225/75R15Paved roads, long distance Fuel efficient, longer tread life 
Forceum M/T 08 Mud Tires LT265/70R17Off-road/mud Self-cleaning tread, Mud terrain 

FAQ’s About E- Load Tires

What is load rating E on a tire?

Tires have A-F letters on them that reference the load range (ply rating and pressure. So, if you notice that your tire is marked with the letter E, it means that the tire has a ply rating of 10 and a load pressure of 80 psi (550 kPa).

Can I use a higher load index Tire?

A tire load index tells you how much weight the tire can hold and this is usually stated on the label of the tire. You can switch to a tire with a higher load index and this will increase the weight it can handle.

Does tire pressure increase with load?

No. The volume of the tire does not change when under load, only the shape does. All in all, when loading, always make sure that you are within the recommended psi rating.

Final Thoughts

Wherever and whenever you plan to take your towables, it’s worth investing in quality trailer tires to get the job done. Finding the right tires with an adequate load rating isn’t always easy or straightforward, but we’ve provided a list of the strongest contenders no matter your needs.

Keep in mind fit and function when shopping, and make sure to follow the manufacturer’s guidelines on maximum psi and other specifics to avoid any on-road mishaps. Whatever you choose, towing tires with an E load rating can get you where you need to go much easier than you ever thought possible.

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